Vision, Part I

Vision, Part I

As the human race improves its ability to model complex systems and their interactions, there is and will inevitably be an increased demand for more robust computational, transmission, and storage of data required to perform precise, meaningful, and insightful analysis. The question then becomes, “How will demand be met with supply?”

An example illustrating this conundrum would be useful. In terms of the economy, central banks and sovereign governments attempt to coordinate their efforts through a combination of fiscal and monetary policy to ensure that the proper flow of resources can meet the demand for a variety of activities. However, supply inevitably becomes a problem because the imperfect modeling of the economy falls a bit short to capture the actual reality of resource scarcity in the real world. A human being, sitting at a computer terminal, can artificially inject billions of dollars into the economy at will.

In terms of the communications and computing ecosystem the human race currently depends upon to “crunch” massive amounts of data, the problem is very similar. Moore’s Law may have held true since its inception to the present day and the near foreseeable future. However, due to the limits that the physical world places upon our aspirations, simply adding more of the same low-level architectures and its supporting software to process, store, and transmit data will not keep up with the volume, variety, and velocity at which data is created.

Galapagos Engineering Logo